Triple Chocolate Mousse Cake

July 22nd, 2011  |  81 Comments

A few months ago, reader Mika sent me an email asking if I could recreate a dessert that knocked her socks off at a restaurant in her home town. She wanted to be able to make it whenever the craving hit. And let’s face it, when it comes to chocolate, that could be any time of day or night. It was a Triple Chocolate Mousse Cake and she included a photo, so I could get a visual reference. Looked good to me. I was in.

But I kept peering at that photo. Did my eyes deceive me? Where, oh where was the third part of the “Triple” in the name? If I let my pastry imagination run amuck, Triple Chocolate Mousse would mean there would be three kinds of mousses — one layer each of white, milk, and dark chocolate.

I consulted the Great Sultan: Google.

Turns out, the “triple” refers to the number of layers all totaled, not the number of mousse-only layers, meaning the cake part was counted as a third. I reexamined the photo. Perhaps I needed my glasses, but the cake part was hard to see.

Ah, yes, there it was, acting as a meager bed, barely offering any reason-for-being. It felt a little sad, like sleeping on a thin mattress. In my mind, if it was to be counted as part of the “Triple”, it better step up and play a supporting role.

I decided to make the cake layer more substantial by spreading the batter a little thick before baking. This way, the dessert would offer a little cakey contrast to some of the bites. As for the mousse, any type of chocolate would work, whether it be dark, milk or white, but visually, white chocolate mousse is a perfect contrast to dark chocolate for a tuxedo-like effect. I went with those. Feel free to use whatever chocolate combos you like. If you want to do less work, you can stick with just one mousse and double the recipe, though the color contrast will be lost.

Or alternately, go bonkers. Rename the lot “Four-Chocolate Mousse Cake”, and make all three mousses.

For a little party on the tastebuds, I thought a little crunch would be of benefit. I usually can’t rest without adding a garnish and opted for a simple enhancement of chocolate-covered cereal. It ended up looking like some post-apocalyptic underwater terrain. Love it.

We also have sauce. Most desserts benefit from some kind of sauce, and now that I mention it, you may start noticing that just about all restaurant desserts do have some. Not only does it add more visual interest to a plate, all the forkfulls catch a little and help tie all the components together. It makes for a more finished presentation. And if there are kitchen mishaps, resulting in a too-dry dessert, sauce helps mask the error. Sauce is the ketchup of the dessert world.

I had some fun playing with the molds. I tried some long, skinny molds, if only for the irony of making a calorie-laden cake look like a super model. Then I had some short, wider molds to make mini cakes for 2 (or in my case, for 1). This would also work perfectly well as a large cake, set up in a ring like this.

The cake layer and the chocolate glaze get around. I’ve used the cake here, and the sauce here, and they’re two of the most versatile recipes in my repertoire. They can be dressed up in so many different ways.

This happens to be an eggless mousse, so the chocolate flavor shines through. Since the mix is a little on the loose side, I threw in some gelatin to help hold its structured shape. Keep in mind that any dessert made with gelatin gets more rubbery for each day it sits in the fridge (thanks to evaporating moisture and thus, a hardier concentration of gelatin left behind), so it’s best to consume it the day you defrost it.

Let’s hope this one stands tall and proud and does the original version justice. Only Mika can say for sure.

Individual Triple Chocolate Mousse Cakes

This recipe makes enough mousse for about eight 2″-diameter cakes, give or take, depending on the size of your molds. Make sure you have enough freezer space available to accommodate a sheet pan with ring molds.

The whole recipe must be made at least 6 hours before you plan to serve because the mousse needs a chance to set up, but if you like, you can make each step of this recipe on different days to break up the labor, and just keep it in the freezer until serving day.

There will be plenty of cake and chocolate sauce left, which can both be wrapped well and frozen, or enjoyed as a cake sundae by cutting the cake into squares, topping with a scoop of ice cream, and drizzling with chocolate sauce.

For the chocolate cake layer:
1 stick (112 g) unsalted butter
1 1/3 cups (257 g) sugar 
1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons (56 g) cocoa powder
2 large eggs
2 oz (56 g) dark chocolate, melted
1 3/4 cups (210 g) all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon (4 g) baking powder
3/4 teaspoon (3 g) baking soda
1/4 teaspoon (1 g) salt
1/2 cup (118 ml) water
1/2 cup (118 ml) milk

For the dark chocolate mousse:
1 teaspoon (3 grams) powdered gelatin 
2 tablespoons water
1/2 cup (105 g) whole milk
6 oz (175 g) good quality dark chocolate (or use milk chocolate if you prefer), finely chopped
1 1/4 cup (280 g) heavy cream

For the white chocolate mousse:
1/2 cup (105 g) whole milk
6 oz (175 g) good quality white chocolate
1 teaspoon (3 grams) powdered gelatin 
2 tablespoons water
3/4 cup (180 g) heavy cream

For the chocolate glaze and sauce:
4 oz (112g) dark chocolate, finely chopped
1/2 cup (80g) heavy cream 
3 tablespoons light corn syrup
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

For the chocolate crunch:
1 cup Rice Crispies cereal, or similar rice cereal
2 oz (56 g) dark chocolate

First, the chocolate cake base.

Gettin’ ready. You can see how sweaty my eggs are in the photo. All cold ingredients should be at room temperature for better incorporation. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

chocolate-cake-ingredients

 

Melt the chocolate. I like to chop it up fine like in the “ingredients” photo above, and melt it in the microwave in 30-second intervals. Chocolate burns easily, so stir between every zap. Mine took about 60-90 seconds to melt. Set it aside for the moment.

chocolate-cake-melt-chocolate

 

Using a tabletop or handheld electric mixer, beat the butter, sugar, and cocoa powder together on medium high speed…

chocolate-cake-sugar-butter-cocoa

 

…until smooth, creamy and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Hard to see with the cocoa in the bowl, but this is what it looks like 3 minutes later.

chocolate-cake-cream-butter-sugar

 

Add the eggs, one at a time, until each one disappears into the mix. Be sure to scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl. Looks like a rising sun, no?

chocolate-cake-add-eggs

 

Getting liquidy here. Scrape. The dry, gritty stuff wants to collect at the bottom. Don’t let it win.

chocolate-cake-eggs-added

 

Pour in the melted chocolate. Hopefully, by now your chocolate came down in temperature a little. It should feel like a warm bath. If it’s too hot, it might melt the butter, and that’s no good. If it’s too cold, it might re-solidify into little bits when it hits the cold bowl. So, warm. We want it warm.

chocolate-cake-add-chocolate

 

So far so good. Chocolate added.

chocolate-cake-chocolate-added

 

In a medium bowl, stir together the dry ingredients, which include flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Stir ‘em up good.

chocolate-cake-stir-dry

 

Combine the milk and the water and microwave until hot, about 45 seconds. Like a “too hot” bath.

chocolate-cake-liquid-in-cup

 

Drop the dry ingredients into the mixing bowl…

chocolate-cake-add-dry-2

 

…and mix on low speed…

chocolate-cake-mix-dry

 

…until MOSTLY combined, and then, with the machine still running, pour in the hot water/milk mixture.

chocolate-cake-add-liquid

 

Be sure to scrape the bottom of the bowl again. The dry ingredients tend to hide there. Here’s the finished batter. It should be smooth and lump-free.

chocolate-cake-batter

 

Pour it into a 18″ x 13″ sheet pan that’s been first sprayed with nonstick cooking spray and lined with parchment. (You can use any sized sheet pan with high sides — just pour in enough batter to come about halfway up the sides. If you have leftover batter, you can pour it into greased muffin tins, and bake mini cakes as well.)

 

Spread that sucker out.

 

Bake in your preheated oven for about 18 minutes. Even though I specify a time amount, everyone’s ovens have a personality of their own, so it’s better to just pay attention to what the cake looks like. Here, the top doesn’t look wet anymore…

 

…and it springs back when I do a gentle press. Let it cool to room temperature. (Cake layer can be made a day ahead, if you’d like to break up the labor of this recipe. Wrap the whole thing, sheet pan and all, with plastic very well, and refrigerate.)

 

Cut a cake circle with each ring mold, regardless of which size you’ve decided to use.

 

Here they are on a parchment lined sheet pan, eagerly awaiting mousse. Any sized sheet pan will do, so long as all your molds will fit on it, and the pan fits in your freezer.

 

Now, let’s make some dark chocolate mousse:

Make sure your dark chocolate is finely chopped and waiting in a large bowl. Resist the urge to eat the shards.

 

First we’ll rehydrate the gelatin (otherwise known as “bloom” the gelatin.) Sprinkle it evenly over a small bowl with the water.

 

In 5 minutes, it’ll have slurped up the liquid and will look, well, gelatinous.

 

Next heat up the milk to a simmer in a small sauce pan. Stay close so it doesn’t boil all over.

 

Turn OFF the heat (This is important. When subjected to high heat, gelatin deteriorates and turns grainy) and then scrape the gelatin blob into the hot milk. Swirl the pan around until it’s completely dissolved. It’ll look like there’s nothing more than milk.

 

Pour this milk/gelatin concoction over the finely chopped chocolate…

 

…and let it rest for 2 minutes. The heat from the milk will melt down the chocolate.

 

Whisk it up into a smooth pool of goodness. Set it aside and let it cool to lukewarm. Don’t let it reach room temperature or the gelatin may start to set up.

 

Now, with a clean whisk, whip the cream.

 

A soft peak is perfect. This texture is easiest to fold into the chocolate.

 

Scoop about a third of the whipped cream into the chocolate. Since the chocolate is kind of dense and heavy, this will help lighten it up. When we fold in the rest of the cream, it won’t deflate as much.

 

Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl as you work, gently turning the mix in on itself.

 

Then add the rest of the whipped cream, and gently fold that in.

 

Ooooo, nice lines!

 

All folded. If yours looks a little more liquidy than mine, it’s ok — the mousse will be denser but will still taste good. It probably means your chocolate was on the warm side when you folded the cream, or the cream was whipped a little loose.

 

Pour the mousse into the waiting molds, filling them about halfway, without dripping on the insides of the molds. Otherwise when you’re ready to unmold the finished dessert, the sides will look messy. Put the whole tray in the freezer while you make the white chocolate mousse.

 

Make the white chocolate mousse:

Here are the ingredients. They’re pretty much the same as the dark chocolate mousse, except there’s less cream to whip.

 

The method is also the same as the dark chocolate mousse, and will feel like old hat by now.

Again, we bloom the gelatin.

 

Simmer the milk…

 

scrape in the gelatin, and let it dissolve.

 

The gelatin/milk mix gets poured over the white chocolate…

 

and we whisk it up into a smooth pool.

 

Whip the cream to soft peak stage and fold a third of it in to lighten. I just so happened to whip my cream a little too stiff as seen here.

 

It gave me some trouble when I tried to fold it in.

One lump, or two?

 

If this happens to you, take a whisk, and gently bang out the lumps with a few swift wacks. Again the mousse will be more dense because I beat some of the air out, but it’s still pretty good. Here’s my finished mousse.

 

It gets poured into the molds, most of the way up. Leave some space on top, about 1/8″ – 1/4″ for the chocolate glaze. Pop the tray back into the freezer while you make the glaze and garnish.

 

Make the garnish:

All we need are chopped chocolate and crunchy rice cereal

 

Melt the chocolate in a medium sized bowl by nuking it in a microwave. Start with 30 seconds, stir, then continue with 20 second intervals until it’s completely melted. Chocolate can scorch easily, so it’s best to do the melting in short spurts.

 

All melted.

 

Throw in the cereal…

 

…and work it around the bowl until it’s completely coated. There’s something very satisfying about doing this. If some of this mix makes it into your gullet, I’ll look the other way.

 

Spread it all out on a parchment-lined sheet pan, keeping it in little flat clusters. This way, the cereal bits touch each other, and can dry in chunks. Pop it in the fridge to set up. (This keeps in the fridge for weeks. Once the chocolate sets up, you can break this up and keep the pieces in a small plastic container.)

 

Whew! Lastly, let’s knock out the chocolate sauce/glaze:

Here’s the stuff.

chocolate-sauce-ingredients

 

Pour the heavy cream, corn syrup and oil into a microwave-proof cup and nuke until almost boiling (you might be able to see it gurgling in the cup), about 45 seconds. It will look curdled but pay it no mind. Stir it up to blend.

chocolate-sauce-boil-liquids

Pour over the chocolate and allow to sit for a minute to melt it all.

chocolate-sauce-pour

 

Whisk everything until completely smooth.

chocolate-sauce-whisk-together

Here’s your chocolate sauce/glaze. Yup, it’s that easy. When it’s cold, it’s firm yet soft. When it’s warm, it’s liquid. Very versatile. (You can store this in the fridge for up to a week, but it will firm up. To bring it back to its liquid splendor, microwave it in 30-second intervals and stir between each nuking until it’s saucy.)


Wait until the sauce cools to lukewarm (so it doesn’t melt down the mousse), and carefully pour sauce onto the tops of your molds. It’s going to start setting almost immediately on contact from the cold, so work fast. Back into the freezer they go for at least 4 hours, to fully set. Once set, if you plan to keep them frozen for a while, be sure to wrap the tray very well to keep the cakes from absorbing strange freezer flavors.

 

The day you want to serve them, you can unmold the number you need. They come out of the rings more cleanly when frozen. First, roll them around in the palms of your hands for a minutes. The heat helps release them.

 

Then treat them like a push-pop, and gently press them out. They have a tendancy to slip out and land with a thud on your tray, so go slowly.

 

Here they are all lined up, army-style. Keep them uncovered in the fridge while they defrost. It probably takes a couple of hours to defrost something of this size. If you made a big cake, you may need another hour or two.

Don’t let them sit in the fridge for more than a day. The longer a gelatin-based dessert sits in the fridge, the more rubbery it becomes.

 

Right when you’re ready to serve, warm the chocolate sauce in the microwave for 30 seconds, give it a stir and pour some in your dish. Carefully place a cake in the center, handling it as little as possible to avoid getting grubby fingerprints all over it. Adorn the top and sides with some crunch pieces.

I couldn’t wait another minute.

Triple Chocolate Mousse Cake

This recipe makes enough mousses for about eight 2″-diameter cakes, give or take, depending on the size of your molds. Make sure you have enough freezer space available to accommodate a sheet pan with ring molds.

The whole recipe must be made at least 6 hours before you plan to serve because the mousse needs a chance to set up, but if you like, you can make each step of this recipe on different days to break up the labor, and just keep it in the freezer until serving day.

There will be plenty of cake and chocolate sauce left, which can both be wrapped well and frozen, or enjoy them as a cake sundae by cutting the cake into squares, topping with a scoop of ice cream, and drizzling with chocolate sauce.

For the chocolate cake layer:
1 stick (112 g) unsalted butter
1 1/3 cups (257 g) sugar 
1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons (56 g) cocoa powder
2 large eggs
2 oz (56 g) dark chocolate, melted
1 3/4 cups (210 g) all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon (4 g) baking powder
3/4 teaspoon (3 g) baking soda
1/4 teaspoon (1 g) salt
1/2 cup (118 ml) water
1/2 cup (118 ml) milk

For the dark chocolate mousse:
1 teaspoon (3 grams) powdered gelatin 
2 tablespoons water
1/2 cup (105 g) whole milk
6 oz (175 g) good quality dark chocolate (or use milk chocolate if you prefer), finely chopped
1 1/4 cup (280 g) heavy cream

For the white chocolate mousse:
1/2 cup (105 g) whole milk
6 oz (175 g) good quality white chocolate
1 teaspoon (3 grams) powdered gelatin 
2 tablespoons water
3/4 cup (180 g) heavy cream

For the chocolate glaze and sauce:
4 oz (112g) dark chocolate, finely chopped
1/2 cup (80g) heavy cream 
3 tablespoons light corn syrup
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

For the chocolate crunch:
1 cup Rice Crispies cereal, or similar rice cereal
2 oz (56 g) dark chocolate


First make the chocolate cake layer:

1. All cold ingredients should be at room temperature for better incorporation. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

2. Melt the chocolate. I like to chop it up fine, and melt it in the microwave in 30-second intervals. Chocolate burns easily, so stir between every zap. Mine took about 60-90 seconds to melt. Keep it to the side for the moment.

3. Using a tabletop or handheld electric mixer, beat the butter, sugar, and cocoa powder together on medium high speed until smooth, creamy and fluffy, about 3 minutes.

4. Add the eggs, one at a time, until each one disappears into the mix. Be sure to scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl. The dry, gritty stuff wants to collect at the bottom. Don’t let it win.

5. Pour in the melted chocolate. Hopefully, by now your chocolate came down in temperature a little. It should feel like a warm bath. If it’s too hot, it might melt the butter, and that’s no good. If it’s too cold, it might re-solidify into little bits when it hits the cold bowl. So, warm. We want it warm.

6. In a medium bowl, stir together the dry ingredients, which include flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Stir ‘em up good.

7. Combine the milk and the water in a microwave-safe cup and microwave them until hot, about 45 seconds. Like a “too hot” bath.

8. Drop the dry ingredients into the mixing bowl and mix on low speed until MOSTLY combined, and then, with the machine still running, pour in the hot water/milk mixture. Be sure to scrape the bottom of the bowl again. The dry ingredients tend to hide there.

9. Pour the batter into a 18″ x 13″ sheet pan that’s been first sprayed with nonstick cooking spray and lined with parchment. (You can use any sized sheet pan with high sides — just pour in enough batter to come about halfway up the sides. If you have leftover batter, you can pour it into greased muffin tins, and bake mini cakes as well.) Spread it out evenly.

10. Bake in your preheated oven for about 18 minutes. Even though I specify a time amount, everyone’s ovens have a personality of their own, so it’s better to just pay attention to what the cake looks like. It shouldn’t look wet on top and will spring back when lightly pressed with your fingertips. Let it cool to room temperature. (Cake layer can be made a day ahead, if you’d like to break up the labor of this recipe. Wrap the whole thing, sheet pan and all, with plastic very well, and refrigerate.)

11. Cut a cake circle with each ring mold, regardless of which size you’ve decided to use. Place the molds on a parchment-lined sheet pan, one that will fit in your freezer.

Now, let’s make some dark chocolate mousse:

1. Make sure your dark chocolate is finely chopped and waiting in a large bowl. Resist the urge to eat the shards.

2. First we’ll rehydrate the gelatin (otherwise known as “bloom” the gelatin.) Sprinkle it evenly over a small bowl with the water. In 5 minutes, it’ll have slurped up the liquid and will look, well, gelatinous.

3. Next heat up the milk to a simmer in a small sauce pan. Stay close so it doesn’t boil all over.

4. Turn OFF the heat (This is important. When subjected to high heat, gelatin deteriorates and turns grainy) and then scrape the gelatin blob into the hot milk. Swirl the pan around until it’s completely dissolved. It’ll look like there’s nothing more than milk.

5. Pour this milk/gelatin concoction over the finely chopped chocolate and let it rest for 2 minutes. The heat from the milk will melt down the chocolate. Whisk it up into a smooth pool of goodness. Set it aside and let it cool to lukewarm. Don’t let it reach room temperature or the gelatin may start to set up.

6. Now, with a clean whisk, whip the cream to soft peaks. This texture is easiest to fold into the chocolate.

7. Scoop about a third of the whipped cream into the chocolate and fold in. Since the chocolate is kind of dense and heavy, this will help lighten it up. When we fold in the rest of the cream, it won’t deflate as much. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl as you work, gently turning the mix in on itself. Then add the rest of the whipped cream, and gently fold that in.

8. Pour the mousse into the waiting molds, filling them about halfway, without dripping on the insides of the molds. Otherwise when you’re ready to unmold the finished dessert, the sides will look messy. Put the whole tray in the freezer while you make the white chocolate mousse.

Make the white chocolate mousse:

The ingredients and method are pretty much the same as the dark chocolate mousse, except there’s less cream to whip.

1. Make sure your white chocolate is finely chopped and waiting in a large bowl.

2. First we’ll rehydrate the gelatin. Sprinkle it evenly over a small bowl with the water. In 5 minutes, it’ll have slurped up the liquid and will look, well, gelatinous.

3. Next heat up the milk to a simmer in a small sauce pan. Stay close so it doesn’t boil all over.

4. Turn OFF the heat (This is important. When subjected to high heat, gelatin deteriorates and turns grainy) and then scrape the gelatin blob into the hot milk. Swirl the pan around until it’s completely dissolved. It’ll look like there’s nothing more than milk.

5. Pour this milk/gelatin concoction over the finely chopped chocolate and let it rest for 2 minutes. The heat from the milk will melt down the chocolate. Whisk it up into a smooth pool of goodness. Set it aside and let it cool to lukewarm. Don’t let it reach room temperature or the gelatin may start to set up.

6. Now, with a clean whisk, whip the cream to soft peaks. This texture is easiest to fold into the chocolate.

7. Scoop about a third of the whipped cream into the chocolate and fold in. Since the chocolate is kind of dense and heavy, this will help lighten it up. When we fold in the rest of the cream, it won’t deflate as much. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl as you work, gently turning the mix in on itself. Then add the rest of the whipped cream, and gently fold that in.

8. It gets poured into the molds, most of the way up. Leave some space on top, about 1/8″ – 1/4″ for the chocolate glaze. Pop the tray back into the freezer while you make the glaze and garnish.

Make the garnish:

All we need are chopped chocolate and crunchy rice cereal

1. Melt the chocolate in a medium sized bowl by nuking it in a microwave. Start with 30 seconds, stir, then continue with 20 second intervals until it’s completely melted. Chocolate can scorch easily, so it’s best to do the melting in short spurts.

2. Throw in the cereal, and work it around the bowl until it’s completely coated. There’s something very satisfying about doing this. If some of this mix makes it into your gullet, I’ll look the other way.

3. Spread it all out on a parchment-lined sheet pan, keeping it in little flat clusters. This way, the cereal bits touch each other, and can dry in chunks. Pop it in the fridge to set up. (This keeps in the fridge for weeks. Once the chocolate sets up, you can break this up and keep the pieces in a small plastic container.)

Whew! Almost done. Let’s knock out the chocolate sauce/glaze:

1. Pour the heavy cream, corn syrup and oil into a microwave-proof cup and nuke until almost boiling (you might be able to see it gurgling in the cup), about 45 seconds. It will look curdled but pay it no mind. Stir it up to blend.

2. Pour over the chocolate and allow to sit for a minute to melt it all. Whisk everything until completely smooth.

Yup, it’s that easy. When it’s cold, it’s firm yet soft. When it’s warm, it’s liquid. Very versatile. (You can store this in the fridge for up to a week, but it will firm up. To bring it back to its liquid splendor, microwave it in 30-second intervals and stir between each nuking until it’s saucy.)

3. Wait until the sauce cools to lukewarm (so it doesn’t melt down the mousse), and carefully pour sauce onto the tops of your molds. It’s going to start setting almost immediately on contact from the cold, so work fast. Back into the freezer they go for at least 4 hours, to fully set. Once set, if you plan to keep them frozen for a while, be sure to wrap the tray very well to keep the cakes from absorbing strange freezer flavors.

To serve:

1. The day you want to serve them, you can unmold the number you need. They come out of the rings more cleanly when frozen. First, roll them around in the palms of your hands for a minutes. The heat helps release them.

Then treat them like a push-pop, and gently press them out. They have a tendancy to slip out and land with a thud on your tray, so go slowly.

2. Keep them uncovered in the fridge while they defrost. It probably takes a couple of hours to defrost something of this size. If you made a big cake, you may need another hour or two.

Don’t let them sit in the fridge for more than a day. The longer a gelatin-based dessert sits in the fridge, the more rubbery it becomes.

3. Right when you’re ready to serve, warm the chocolate sauce in the microwave for 30 seconds, give it a stir and pour some in your dish. Carefully place a cake in the center, handling it as little as possible to avoid getting grubby fingerprints all over it. Adorn the top and sides with some crunch pieces.

Close your eyes and get lost in the wonder of it all.






81 Responses to “Triple Chocolate Mousse Cake”

  1. Sarah Griffin says:

    I have seen a cake similar to this that my gran used to make but i cant find it anywhere. It basically only uses a sponge base (with a touch of alcohol!) then 3 layers of chocolate. The chocolate layers were just from chocolate and cream the each layer frozen. Very sickly cake but absolutely gorgeous. I want to make it again but not sure what ratio of chocolate and cream to use as I no longer have the recipe. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks

  2. ashina says:

    hi.. i am unable to find powdered gelatin. i have the sheets, is that any good? and how can i use the sheets? is the orley whip dessert cream the same as heavy cream?

  3. Emily says:

    This looks amazing! I’m trying it for Valentines day next week – thank you so much for your detailed instructions as well as delivering it all with a lovely sense of humor and wit! :)

  4. Edith chan says:

    I would like to make this pretty cake for my best friend’s birthday! Can anyone tell me how can I adjust the recipe in order to fit in a 5-inch heart shape mousse mold? Thanks a lot!

  5. jackie says:

    I tried the mousse and it was fabulous! I did bittersweet chocolate and it turned out ok. I learned that my husband does nor prefer it, but he still ate it in two sittings. I also did the wwhite chocolate and added some coffee to it and it turned out sooo yummy! However I did not have the gelatine and left it out. It’s fine frozen but seems to start melting just like ice cream once I took it out of the freezer. Can I use flavored gelatin? (like jello) easy way to add different flavors maybe?

  6. PastryPal says:

    Hi Jackie, Thanks for trying the mousse cake! You can definitely experiment with gelatin packets and flavors. Might be very unusual and interesting. Though I usually find the plain gelatin right next to the flavored ones, so you can hopefully have it in your arsenal for this and other recipes.

  7. Kerri D says:

    Hi! I am interested in making this, but i dont need individual cakes i need one cake….can i make it with a spring pan? and what size? would i bake the first layer right into the cake?

  8. laurel says:

    I made this for my father’s birthday, it was wonderful! I also added raspberry jam to the white chocolate mousse it was a nice twist, everyone enjoyed it. Thanks for the great recipe!!

  9. Candi says:

    I very much appreciate the detailed instructions and pictures, as I just made a triple chocolate mousse cake and I followed the directions very carefully. I was concerned when my white chocolate layer was very liquidy (because I had the lumps and had to use the whisk). I’m glad to see that it will still be ok based on your pictures and instructions, as this is for a customer of mine, and they will be eating it on Easter. So relieved to have found this after the fact. It sets my mind at ease. :-)

  10. Cinta says:

    Hi Irina,

    I’m going into my last step…. the glazing. I don’t have corn syrup, what can I substitute it with? Will honey do?

    Many thanks!

  11. Julia says:

    I will make this for a Dinner Club evening, can’t wait to taste it!!! Thank you for sharing the recipe and great instructions! One question: can I use maple syrup instead of corn? Thanks!!

  12. grace says:

    Love your blog,I made the cake on the weekend , my daughter said this is best dessert ever.

    My white chocolate mousse didn’t set like dark after overnight any tip?

    Thanks

  13. Deborah says:

    I found White Chocolate mousse mix and used that… It comes out perfect everytime and I don’t have to worry about it being too thin.

  14. dhea says:

    will it set in 2 hrs?

  15. PastryPal says:

    dhea — I’m guessing I’m too late with my answer since you need some quick dessert. It might, depending on how much cold blast you get from your freezer, but if it was the first time I was making a dessert, I wouldn’t gamble it.

  16. Alex says:

    I made this dessert for a couple of guests and they loved it! I didn’t have any ring molds on me so I used small cups and lined it with parchment paper and it worked fine. The garnish really added an extra something to the look — and it tasted good! Thanks for the great recipe :)

  17. sezer senli says:

    Hey there, I’ve made this cake several time, it’s a great recipe. Thank you very much for the recipe and detailed explanation.
    I have two questions.
    I’m getting trouble on getting the layers even, so not all of the cakes look uniform. Some have more dark chocolate and some have more white chocolate. Do you have a technique or idea that would help me set all the cakes even.
    And also for the garnish, I couldn’t find crunchy rice cereal here. I wanna have a crunchy garnish but I couldn’t come up with anything. Any ideas?
    Thanks in advance

  18. jackie says:

    So I was going to use your mousse recipe as a topping for mini cheesecakes. I think it will be absolutely delish….do you have any suggestions on getting the mousse to a consistency where I can pipe it?

  19. Andy says:

    Loved the recipe; I used tall slim sardine cans with both ends removed as molds. And yes they do go “plop” when un-molding, I had to retrieve mine from the floor.

  20. PastryPal says:

    Jackie — Which mousse? The chocolate should already be pipeable, and the white chocolate, I’d suggest leaving it in the fridge until it starts to firm up just enough to pipe.

  21. PastryPal says:

    Hi Sezer — Glad you enjoyed the cake! I would suggest pouring the mousse into a pastry bag and piping. This can give you more control in how much ends up in the mold. As far as crunchy cereal, you could really use any. Corn flakes is a good substitution.

  22. Rita Maria says:

    Wow! This looks so amazing. It reminds me of a desert I always buy at Whole Foods. The one I’ve tried has a layer of coffee infused mousse. Excellent! Thank you!

  23. OMG!! These look absolutely amazing! Everyone who has these would surely be impressed! I can’t wait to make these when I have our friends over for dinner! Thank you for sharing your amazing dessert!

  24. Asmita says:

    Gorgeous! Absolutely speechless on how beautiful these are! I have to make these soon. Do I need to but a ring mould and where can I get them?

  25. Franca says:

    I just made it. Everything went great but next time i will just make it without the cake and make a milk chocolate layer. The flavor and texture of the mousse is delicious.
    Thanks for the recipe.

  26. Fatima says:

    Because of dietary restrictions, I can’t have gelatin. Any substitutes that you think would work well?

  27. Jeane says:

    Appears to be a lot of work, but also very pretty. I would like to know where you found the
    molds you are using. So far I have only seen them on line out of Sweden. Help if you can.
    Thank you

  28. chef rob sandy says:

    very good ,nice and out satnding

  29. Stephanie says:

    I’ve made this before and loved it but knew many of my guests didn’t care for how bitter tasting the dark chocolate mousse was. I’d like to make it again substituting milk chocolate for the dark chocolate. Are all the ingredient measurements the same?

    Thank you Pastry Pal!

  30. Alice says:

    I was wondering what size cake tin i would need to make it as one cake??

    thanks

  31. PastryPal says:

    Hi Alice — You can get a 10″ cake with this recipe.

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